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GRAFFITI AFRICA GALLERY

Graffiti and street art from other parts of Africa.

Skarz graffiti in Madagascar

Graffiti by Skarz in Madagascar…

Pics courtesy of Skarz

Viva Con Agua project in Uganda

The small crew of Chaoze One, Rebelz, Michael Fritz, Lutz Zaumseil and filmmaker Julia Dragon were recently involved with a project in the East African country of Uganda. They are from Viva con Agua, a charity organization that is involved with the creation and support of drinking water sources in developing countries. Along with partners, the World Hunger Relief, the organisation helps with the construction and rehabilitation of wells and spring mounts

Some members of the crew are artists and have painted these graffiti pieces on their visit thus far:

Source: Viva con Agua

We Are All Khaled Said - Graffiti and the Egyptian Revolution

We are all Khaled Said – Berlin Wall from Traverse Streetcultures on Vimeo.

Khaled Said, a symbolic figure and the face of the revolution in Egypt, was recently awarded the Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation‘s Human Rights Award 2011 together with Slim Amamou from Tunisia in Berlin on September 19th 2011. The tragic death of the Egyptian Internet activist, rapper and blogger sparked massive protests, with the Facebook page “We are all Khaled Said” becoming a strong force within the revolution.

Many have paid tribute to Khaled Said with graffiti, street art murals and stencils in Cairo and Alexandria where he died on 6 June 2010 - brutally beaten by policemen. At the award ceremony in Berlin, he was honoured by having his portrait painted by German artist Andreas von Chrzanowski aka Case from the famous photo realist graffiti crew, Ma’Claim. This commemorative portrait was painted on a piece of the Berlin wall and transported to the venue.

Khaled Said’s portrait, painted by Case. Text above: “Khaled’s rights are Egypt’s rights” painted by Zahraa Kassem. Text below: “We are all Khaled Said”, calligraphy by Mohamed Gaber painted by Case.

They broke down the Berlin Wall for freedom and unity. Khaled Said got killed for the same reason, for freedom and democracy. Khaled would be very happy if he was with us today. We will not forget you Khaled and we will bring your rights back. And we will bring every Egyptian’s right back. We are all Khaled Said!” - Zahraa Said Kassem, Khaled’s sister who received the award on his behalf.

Zahraa Said Kassem with Slim Amanou

Now, as part of a project with the Goethe Institute, new portraits have been painted by Case in Khaled Said’s home town of Alexandria and in the capital, Cairo. The rest of the Ma’Claim crew were also present and together they painted a mural symbolising peace, freedom and victory.

Portrait in front of the Townhouse Gallery of an Egyptian boy whom Case met in the street while painting in Cairo.

Tribute to the Arab Revolution” by Ma’Claim crew (Akut, Tasso, Case, Rusk), Alexandria, 2011.

GIF-Animation: Like the revolution, the mural “uses” the Internet to reveal its message.

Below are videos of Joel Sames (documentarian of the project from the beginning) with Khaled’s Said’s mother Laila Marzouk and his sister Zahraa Kassem, discussing the project on an Egyptian TV show. Both Khaled’s mother and sister are still strong advocates in Egypt’s unfinished revolution.


This is a project by Don Karl, publisher and co-author of the book “Arabic Graffiti” & Hip Hop Stuetzpunkt Berlin - in collaboration with The Dudes Factory (Freedom Park) & Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation.

Photos and video by Joel Sames (courtesy of From Here to Fame).

Project DK “R” in Senegal II

As mentioned in a post earlier this year, the second phase of the DK “R” project will take place in November and December 2011. This time round the artists Jérôme Désert (Belgium) and Jerome Maillet aka Jeronimo (France) will collaborate with two Senegalese artists; Mamadou Diallo Sadio (SAADIO) and Barkinado BOCOUM.

Here are more videos from the first phase of the project which took place in April and May 2011:

All pics courtesy of Jéronimo

Upcoming Graffiti Events in Egypt

From Here To Fame Publishing present two upcoming events in Egypt to promote their recently published book, Arabic Graffiti.


20 October – Alexandria, Egypt

  • Arabic Graffiti – book and project presentation by the Don STONE Karl
  • Street Art & the Revolution – lecture by Mohamed Gaber
    >> @ Goethe Institute Alexandria

22 October – Cairo, Egypt

  • Arabic Graffiti – book and project presentation by the Don STONE Karl
  • Street Art & the Revolution – lecture by Mohamed Gaber
    >> @ The Townhouse Gallery

For further information please contact:

From Here To Fame Publishing
Inga Dehl | Sales & Marketing
Tel: 0049-(0)30-21021 86-70 | Fax: 0049-(0)30-21021 86-77
Marienburgerstr. 16 A | 10405 Berlin / Germany
email: inga@fhtf.de
www.fromheretofame.com

Be sure to check out their publication of South African artist Faith47.

Armsrock in Cairo, Egypt

Danish artist Asbjørn Skou a.k.a Armsrock visited Egypt in June 2010 and participated in the “Streets of Cairo” event. He made temporary light installations from projected needle-etched slides. He also did the paste-up below…



This charcoal paste-up was then painted over with white paint by the Cairo Police.

http://www.armsrock.blogspot.com/

Graffiti in Mozambique

Shot B & Spank One in Maputo, Mozambique…
The first wall in the country done with Montana Colors.

Read the article on the Montana World blog HERE

Photos: Dilayla Romeo.

Wholetrain’ Graffiti Movie Screening in Zimbabwe

The graffiti movie WHOLETRAIN will be screening in ZIMBABWE

Location: Shoko Festival at Alliance Francaise, 328 Herbert Chitepo, Harare
Date: September 24, 16h00

Director Florian Gaag will be present for Q&A.

>> MORE INFO

Uganda Graffiti

Some graffiti in Uganda…

Source: Streetfiles.org

UND in Sierra Leone

Monk and Crio, UND/BA (Germany)
Freetown, Sierra Leone, 2010

Makweni, Sierra Leone, 2010

All images from Street Files, used under the Creative Commons licence.

Laguna in Morocco

Spanish artist Laguna in Tanger, Morocco (2009)

Click on a thumbnail to view larger image…

All pics courtesy of Laguna

Project DK “R” in Senegal

The DK “R” project is a street art project in Dakar, Senegal. The two artists behind the project are Jérôme Désert (Belgium) and Jerome Maillet aka Jeronimo (France).

Jeronimo lived in Dakar between 2007 and 2009 and Jerome made a trip to Senegal in 2010. Both artists had a common desire to talk about identity, movement, energy and the people of Dakar directly on the walls.

The city became their canvas as they left the gallery space and plastered many walls with large format images of the people. The first stage of the project took place in April and May 2011.

The second phase of the DK “R” project takes place in November and December 2011 in collaboration with two Senegalese artists; Mamadou Diallo Sadio (SAADIO) and Barkinado BOCOUM. They will help Jerome and Jeronimo because they are very familiar with the city. This time they will split into two pairs to cover more ground.

During this second phase, from November 20 to December 15, an interaction with the public and the owners of the walls will be identified. The artists will interview the locals and gather oral evidence of the history and current events of the walls on which interventions take place. These stories will then be transcribed (in fragments) and inserted into the monumental compositions using typography cut on site. The participation of the people will form an integral part in the project, manifesting greater relevance and enabling local residents to have their say.

All the artists will make drawings in their respective workshops, thus keeping their own point of view. All compositions and associations of the pasted drawings will be improvised on the walls, leaving a possibility of interaction with the places and people. The walls covered will be between 5 and 7 meters high, each collage becoming its very own urban event.

All pics courtesy of Jéronimo

JR’s Inside Out Project in Tunisia

The first episode of a long series about JR’s Inside Out Project.

Since the 2011 TED Prize winner JR announced his wish in March to turn the world Inside Out, thousands of people have participated in what we hope will be the world’s largest participatory art project.

>> http://www.insideoutproject.net/

Addentry in Kenya

German artist Addentry visited and painted in Kenya in 2010. During their time in Nairobi they were also involved in a one month workcamp with a group called Simama e.V.

Simama e.V (which means get up, start over, make a difference) is a group that runs social projects to promote cross-cultural communication. They connect with artists living in the slums of Nairobi to help them with developing infrastructure like gallery space as well as getting them in contact with the art scene. Addentry joined the group as they gave art workshops and they taught the community how to print T-shirts, how to knit with plastic waste and general painting.

The orphanage called Halfway House was painted as part of the project by some Simama members, artists of the Mukuru slums and the children that live in the home.

The slum house was painted by Addentry with two artists of Mukuru. One of the artists was invited to Germany this year and they painted a mural together.

The Simama e.V group also bought a lot of paintings from the Kenyan artists where they presented those works in two big exhibitions.

More about Simama e.V:
http://www.simama.de/ and on Facebook

Special thanks to Addentry

Wide Open Walls 2011 Reflections

Reflections on the 2011 Wide Open Walls project from some of those involved:

(All images by Jonx Pillemer, except where noted).

Freddy Sam

pic by Sydelle Willow Smith:

Freddy Sam (Artist, South Africa / Curator)
The idea that art can effect positive change is a sensitive one, in my heart it is right, but responsible action is the key word here. I think we carried this out not only with glowing open hearts and full belief, but also viewed this with complex and analytical thought during and after the project, we are left with an experience that will effect us and the villages for life, a moment that we will share forever and that I know we will continue to build on with the input of the communities. The project has also given me so many insights that I will carry through into my community art projects back home in South Africa. It was inspiring to witness artists dancing in their work, to allow their environment to affect them and to release this energy with love into the walls, conversations and moments shared, with real interest and support in what they are doing from the community. A visual song, a dialogue, a true cultural exchange.

Freddy Sam

Know Hope (Artist, Israel)
Painting in the villages was different from painting in a city because I actually met and got to know the people on whose wall I was painting on, which is usually not the case. One thing that I think wasn’t new, but definitely amplified and more present, was the direct interaction, impact and transformation (I only use this word for the lack of finding a more precise one) that the work had on the village. It became a happening-as, for, by and with the community.

Know Hope

Know Hope

TIKA (Artist, Switzerland)
At first, the fact of me being invited to come and paint in a rural village, where the roads are made of red, bouncy soil, water has to be pumped and electricity is not yet for everyone, roused a lot of questions… Does the village life in it’s humble, present way, need to be changed? Should these villages really become a tourist attraction? Shouldn’t it be the people from the villages themselves painting their compounds? But then, very soon, I realised that the Internet has already reached and Toubabs (white tourists) have already been throwing minthies (sweets) from their vans to the kids.

So, my conclusion is that it’s better to have a bunch of artist like us to come, with all our concerns, wanting to do good and beautiful and our, maybe naive, belief of sharing friendship, art and thoughts to give the circle of change a twist in the direction where humans treat each other respectfully and equal despite gender, race or social background.

TIKA

TIKA

Remed (Artist, Spain)
It is completely different painting here to painting in Europe. In the west a spray-can often represents a tool of vandalism, here I really feel welcome. I feel free. There is a great sense of support towards your art, a really strong sense of peace and unity, everything is flowing so easily. I think public street art can affect positive change as it alters the environment in a good way if it spreads a positive message in direct combat to advertising billboards for example.

Remed

Remed

Njogu (Artist: Bushdwellers)
Wide Open Walls is a democratic and interactive street art project bringing artist of the world to celebrate through art, all good things in life, environmental awareness, peace, love and respect for our cultural values. For me as a Gambian artist it is inspirational to work alongside and share with our international friends that make the long journey to experience Africa. The community spirit will stay alive through such projects. Africa and the world unite!

Bushdwellers

Selah (Artist, South Africa)
My art is entirely relational and contextual. As a process it starts with a conversation and in practice is realised literally as a publication on the wall. This process was very closely aligned to the values of the family heads and chiefs with whom I spoke – in terms of the power of conversation, negotiation, listening – and was therefore received with enthusiasm and joy. My texts were always already present within the thought and values of these Gambians with whom I shared so much tea – and had then only to be illuminated on their homes.

Selah

Selah

Rowan Pybus (Film-maker / Photographer)
I have been working with street artists in communities for a few years now in South Africa and often we don’t have enough time to understand our surroundings. WOW allows for more interaction, more conversation, and in the end more of a connection with the community. It’s about sharing. With the film I am hoping to show off the mixing of two worlds and the peace that came from it.

ROA by Rowan Pybus:

pic by Rowan Pybus:

Jonx Pillemer (Photographer)
Cool, and unique project. [I’m] very interested in watching this grow over the years, and [it’s] fantastic to have been part of it.

Sydelle Willow Smith (Anthropologist/Photographer)
I am always quite sceptacle of development projects coming into an area and deciding what is best for the communities living there, I have seen them fail far to often back home in South Africa. I like the fact that art creates a subtle, malleable platform that bridges boundaries allowing for conversations between communities and outsiders to stand as equals engaging, voicing their concerns, through a “universal” language to some degree. WOW is in its beginning stages and needs some ironing out in terms of this dialectic, but I believe it is off to a strong and worthy start and [I] look forward to what the future holds.

pic by Sydelle Willow Smith:

ROA by Sydelle Willow Smith:

James English (Artist: Bushdwellers / Founder of WOW)
The Ballabu Conservation Project is an 85 square kilometer area, encompassing 14 villages with roughly 100,000 people living within the area. The Ballabu was created to bring unity to the community, to encourage sustainability and conservation and to keep traditional rural lifestyles in place. I believe that the Wide Open Walls project can help stop the Rural Urban Drift, where the young people of the rural communities leave the family structure and go to the cities, which leads to the death of traditional practices and culture. By giving the young people of these villages something to be proud of they are more willing to stay and keep the traditions of the village alive. The Eden Project in the UK has given the Ballabu a full time exhibit in the Tropical Biome, which is seen by over one million people a year.

Bushdwellers

Bushdwellers

Lawrence Williams (Artist: Bushdwellers / Founder of WOW)
The most inspiring thing for me this year was how easily all of the artists adapted to, and became part of the community. I know there was some initial questions from the artists, as to why they were here and how were they going to be received in rural Africa. On the first day we brought together the heads of the 14 villages to meet the artists, so that they could give their blessing for this years WOW to take place. One of the chiefs said it best – ‘Don’t be in two minds. You are welcome in our villages’. By the end of the project there was a real sense of community built between the artists and the villagers, with friendships created and barriers broken down so that everyone was on the same level.

pic by Rowan Pybus:

Wide Open Walls 2011 Overview

The 2nd annual Wide Open Walls project took place from 3-17 June 2011. There was an amazing artist line-up this year and it featured some of the best artists from around the world. There was also more concern with the interaction with local communities as the project is hoping to grow in this regard. South African photographers, one also being an anthropologist, accompanied the artists as they ventured through Senegal and into the heart of The Gambia. This was a heart, soul and mind-opening adventure for all that took part.

All photos by Jonx Pillemer, except where stated.

Remed

Best Ever

Freddy Sam

Know Hope

Roa

Wide Open Walls 2011 Press Release

Wide Open Walls was founded by Lawrence Williams, one of the owners of Makasutu, a conservation project home to a set of magnificent river lodges at Mandina in The Gambia, West Africa. Lawrence, a keen artist, has been working with local artists on a project called Bushdwellers for a number of years and has always wanted to expand the project into something more, something lasting that could both function as a valid art installation in itself and at the same time promote The Gambia as a tourist destination. The basic idea was to turn villages in the area (falling under the Ballabu Conservation Project) into a living art project. This year saw the first time collaboration between Wide Open Walls and Write On Africa, a South African based organisation founded by Ricky Lee Gordon (a.k.a Freddy Sam). “Write On Africa” is a community art project based in Cape Town, South Africa. Its main focus is to encourage inspiration and urban rejuvenation through special events, initiatives and art in public space to “inspire ourselves to inspire others to inspire change”.

Best Ever

ROA

TIKA

Working with the community

WOW 2011 street artists were selected not only for their suitable styles but also for their approach and attitude towards making and sharing art. The line-up included Bushdwellers (The Gambia), ROA (Belgium), Know Hope (Israel), Remed (Madrid), TIKA (Switzerland), Freddy Sam (SA), Selah (SA), and Best Ever (UK). The immediate goals of the project were to create connections between the street artists and the communities through mural painting, art workshops and extended interventions. Art supplies were provided for children of various villages, and a dilapidated classroom was refurbished by Freddy Sam and community members, creating a colourful space for children to use as a crèche and a classroom. South African photographer, Jonx Pillemer and film-maker Rowan Pybus were there to capture the two week long project, spending ample time with community members and the street artists reflecting on the interactions and friendships formed during the collaborative creative processes. The 10-minute documentary will be released online in August. Rowan will then continue to document the project year by year with the intention of releasing a full length, in depth documentary.

Research was conducted utilizing ethnographic methods compiled by anthropology student, film-maker/photographer, Sydelle Willow Smith. She conducted a variety of interviews with community members, organisers and street artists. This research will aid the preliminary stages of the next Wide Open Walls project, serving archival purposes, as well as ensuring that direct collaboration between the community and the project is ensured throughout the process. We hope this information will then inspire more like-minded projects around the world.

Know Hope

Know Hope

Selah

Best Ever

Know Hope & Bushdwellers

ROA

Long term this project also seeks to raise funds for the village through the publication of a book. We will also aim to create an exhibition/fundraiser and sell photographs of the artwork to raise funds which will be distributed through the local NGO (the Ballabu Conservation Project) that has been set up by James English of Makasutu Cultural Forest in conjunction with all 14 chiefs of Ballabu. The project also aims to sustain an ethos of responsible tourism and it has been suggested that tourists, who want to visit the murals, will have to make a donation to the trust and will be expected to immerse themselves in the villages they visit through forms of cross cultural exchange to ensure that a sense of a “drive-by human zoo” is not created.

With the input of several key members from villages we have now begun the initial stage of designing a more in-depth cultural exchange program that will include local artists and allow for a greater dialogue. We are also investigating residency opportunities to allow for artists, writers, musicians, poets and researchers to stay within the villages and contribute their time and work in the form of teaching and skill sharing, working alongside their local Gambian counterparts, ensuring that as WOW grows so does the structure that keeps it in place.

ROA

Working with the community

Freddy Sam in collaboration with Selah, Know Hope and the children of Galloya village, pic by Rowan Pybus

Remed, pic by Sydelle Willow Smith

Bushdwellers

Selah

In conclusion we are very aware of the sensitive nature of this project and how our imprint and intervention can affect the village. As one of the chiefs said, “they will come to see the art and will find our ethos and way of life and want to learn from us”. This exchange of knowledge and practice is something that WOW plans to continually engage with, learning and growing along the way. A popular saying we heard in the villages of The Gambia sums it all up quite succinctly, simply put that it is “nice to be nice.”

ROA

Connecting with the community

TIKA

Remed

Best Ever & Selah

Freddy Sam

ROA, pic by Sydelle Willow Smith

For artists travel blogs please visit http://www.wideopenwalls.co.za/ and for more information or images contact Ricky Lee Gordon (curator) directly at rickylee@writeonafrica.com

Please also visit and support the Wide Open Walls Facebook page where you will find updated news and images. The 2011 documentary film by Rowan Pybus is scheduled for online release in August.

The next date for Wide Open Walls has not been set allowing for sufficient time to rebuild a strong foundation and sustainable program together with the input of the villages.

Write on Swaziland

Write On Africa is currently in The Gambia for Wide Open Walls 2011. But, that isn’t the only African country in which they have created inspiration and change. A while ago they were invited to Swaziland by Pact to create a communication strategy to better communicate the work that Pact had been doing in communities.

They were in the country for a week, each day being taken to see a new Pact supported project. They ended off the week with a mural project. You can read more about the whole trip HERE.

Some pictures of the murals being painted:

Artwork by Freddy Sam and Xanele

http://www.writeonafrica.org/

Selah in Zimbabwe

Andrew Breitenberg a.k.a Selah from Cape Town “draws symbols and texts in the margins of society – be they alleys, townships or street corners – to try and make a contribution toward the dignity of the people living in those places”.

He is currently in The Gambia for Wide Open Walls 2011 but has also painted in Zimbabwe. Here are a couple of pictures of his ‘street art’ in Zimbabwe…

in Chinotimba, by Victoria Falls:

in Borrowdale, Harare:

http://www.onestreetherald.com

Wide Open Walls 2011 - First Glimpse

The village children sing in front of one of the first art works of the 2011 Wide Open Walls project - ROA in The Gambia!

>> MORE INFO

Cook’s pixel graffiti in Namibia

Cook a.k.a Pixel Monster is a graffiti artist from Spain that has been living in Namibia. He spent time there in 2010 and 2011 and painted in Lüderitz among other places .

He also went to Cape Town and painted with Toe:

http://www.cook.org.es/

Wide Open Walls 2011

Wide Open Walls 2011 is upon us. This year the project is curated by South Africa’s Freddy Sam who runs the Write On Africa initiative.

Artist line-up:
- Roa (Belgium)
- Tika (Switzerland)
- Know Hope (Israel)
- Best Ever (UK)
- Remed (Spain)
- BushDwellers (The Gambia)
- Freddy Sam (SA)
- Selah (SA)
- Jonx (SA - Photographer)
- Rowan(SA - Video/Film)
- Sydelle (SA - Anthropologist)

Follow the project:
http://wideopenwalls.withtank.com/ and on Facebook

Read more about the 2010 project HERE.

Equatorial Guinea graffiti

Graffiti art in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea

Cairo Trains II

More train graffiti in Egypt:

Thanks to Disco Rick.

Epik and Raze in Lesotho

Cape Town graffiti writers Epik and Raze spent their 2010 Christmas in Lesotho…

David Choe in the Congo

Zéh Palito in Zambia

Brazilian artist Zéh Palito spent 6 months volunteering for an American/Danish N.G.O in the rural areas of north Zambia in 2010. He educated people about water and sanitation during the week, mainly working with the children. Then on weekends, he could show off his artistic talent.

On Saturdays, Zéh Palito and another friend from Korea, Sim, held classes where they taught the kids about geography, sport and art. They realised that there was not much entertainment for the kids besides them playing games with stones (kabulila), playing with tyres, and soccer. These new interactive classes became the Saturday Club.

On Sundays, it was Zéh Palito’s day off - painting time!

Having only come across spray paint twice in his whole 6 month trip, which was very expensive, Zéh Palito mainly used water-based paint and was lucky enough to have a friend get him a much needed red pigment and gold pigment which became the most prized possessions during his stay.

One does not get to see pictures of Zambia very often, especially street art in the rural areas. Because Zéh Palito took so many great photographs and painted some pretty cool pieces, we decided to share some more pics with you.

Below are more pictures from his trip. Be sure to check out his Flickr page for even more pictures of his first African adventure.

“Anyone can’t do everything, But everyone can do something.”

http://www.flickr.com/photos/zehpalito/

Zoo Project in Tunisia

>> VIEW MORE

Graffiti of the Libyan Revolution

Photo by: Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images

View all the photos from Foreign Policy HERE

And read the unfortunate story of graffiti revolutionary, Kais al-Hilali, HERE

Cairo Trains

Train bombing in Cairo, Egypt

Cairo part from Papas Vol. 2 video:

Huslaz whole car:

No Nozzle in North Africa?

JR in Kenya II

Reportage on JR in Kibera, Kenya 2009 by A24media

Iker & Muro in Senegal

Ductos Graff (Iker & Muro) in Dakar

Wide Open Walls 2010

Wide Open Walls, an Art Safari, is a new annual arts project that takes place in The Gambia. Seven artists took part in 2010 where they painted villages such as Kubuneh in the Makasutu Culture Forest over two weeks.

All photo’s by Ian Cox of WallKandy

Read an interview with Eelus, one of the artists and curator of the project, HERE

>> Follow the Wide Open Walls Project here

Check out the video below:

C215 in Morocco

French street artist C215 did his thing in Morocco in 2009.
View his pics from Casablanca HERE and his pics from Fes HERE.

JR in Kenya

French photographer/street artist/activist JR visited the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya as part of his 28 Millimetres project.

This work is also featured in his feature film Women Are Heroes which was released on January 12 2011.

Banksy in Africa

The infamous street artist Banksy was in Africa for a short stint in 2009. The works are thought to be in Mali, though some say he might have visited Cairo.

Jace in Madagascar

Street artist Jace (born in France and now living on Reunion Island) went to Anakao in Madagascar in 2009. He was there for two weeks; living with the people and painting lots of fishing boats.

Morocco Graffiti 04

Tetuan Raps 2008
(AS2 SCRO SKEW REINA ANTRAS)

Morocco Graffiti 03

Graffiti in Tanger

Morocco Graffiti 02

Motor in Morocco

Morocco Graffiti 01

Ston graffiti, Morocco

Senegal Graffiti 02

Diabetes awareness with graffiti, Dakar 2009

Purp in Senegal

Alessandro Cocchia (Purp) in Dakar

Senegal Graffiti 01

Graffiti in Dakar

Essen from Kenya

Essen, graffiti artist - representing Umoja – Kenya

Positive Graffiti Messages in Kenya

Masai Mbili and Solo7 create messages of peace in the ruins of Kibera, Kenya (March 2008)

Kenya Matatus (Taxi Art)